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Bon Voyage
39,90 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 12.02.2019, Medium: Buch, Einband: Gebunden, Titel: Bon Voyage, Titelzusatz: Boutique Hotels for the Conscious Traveler, Auflage: 1. Auflage von 2019 // 1. Auflage, Redaktion: Klanten, Robert // Servert Alonso-Misol, Andrea, Verlag: Gestalten // Die Gestalten Verlag, Sprache: Englisch, Schlagworte: Farbfotografie // Fotografie // Photo // Photographie // Bau // Ökologie // Bauen // Wohnen // Haushalt // Architektur // Bauökologie // Nachhaltigkeit // Grüne Architektur // Handel // Freihandel // Sustainable Development // Hotelführer // Restaurantführer // Übernachtung // ARCHITECTURE // Sustainability & Green Design // BUSINESS & ECONOMICS // Development // Industries // Hospitality // Travel & Tourism // TRAVEL // Food // Lodging & Transportation // Hotels // Inns & Hostels // Pictorials // see also PHOTOGRAPHY // Subjects & Themes // Regional // Special Interest // Ecotourism // Resorts & Spas // Unternehmen und Umwelt // Grüne Unternehmensansätze // Einzel // und Großhandel // Gastgewerbe // Freizeit // und Tourismusindustrie // Reiseführer: Ökotourismus // Reiseführer: Hotels und Urlaubsunterkünfte // Orte und Menschen: Sachbuch // Bildbände, Rubrik: Bildbände, Seiten: 288, Herkunft: ITALIEN (IT), Gewicht: 1440 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

Anbieter: averdo
Stand: 28.10.2020
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Tales from the Great Green Lake , Hörbuch, Digi...
9,95 € *
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Mole is a mole who is afflicted with a parasite, and he's close to losing his position as bass player for the Fresh Kickers, the most popular musical group in the world of the Great Green Lake. His body is ballooning, and something must change...or else. Three raccoons are making their way to the trading post in the Dark Island Terminal, inside an enormous sunken tree hollowed out by generations of resident animals in the lake world. They manage to survive a blizzard high in the Phinnae Mountains, but as they reach the warmer meadows below the snow line, they encounter a feral cat, who has one thing on its mind: catnip. The travelers offer the beast the desired herb, hoping it will be enough to save themselves. Beebe and Jake are two fish friends, and unlike all other fish, work as a team when hunting for food. They begin to brag about their intelligence, and laugh at other fish who are pulled to the upper world by giants with lures and fishing lines. One day, they find out they're not as smart as they thought. It's a typical voyage across the Great Green Lake, as described by a rat who has business at Half Lake Inn. The voyage starts out calm and serene, and the food is served, much to the deep satisfaction of all onboard, when the narrator notices a strange serpent deep in the bottom of Woodland Canyon. The serpent fish swims up from the deep and attacks the submarine ferry, causing terror and panic inside the cabin. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Joe Ravenscroft. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/146913/bk_acx0_146913_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 28.10.2020
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French Beans and Food Scares
33,90 CHF *
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From mad cows to McDonaldization to genetically modified maize, European food scares and controversies at the turn of the millennium provoked anxieties about the perils hidden in an increasingly industrialized, internationalized food supply. These food fears have cast a shadow as long as Africa, where farmers struggle to meet European demand for the certifiably clean green bean. But the trade in fresh foods between Africa and Europe is hardly uniform. Britain and France still do business mostly with their former colonies, in ways that differ as dramatically as their national cuisines. The British buy their 'baby veg' from industrial-scale farms, pre-packaged and pre-trimmed; the French, meanwhile, prefer their green beans naked, and produced by peasants. Managers and technologists coordinate the baby veg trade between Anglophone Africa and Britain, whereas an assortment of commercants and self-styled agro-entrepreneurs run the French bean trade. Globalization, then, has not erased cultural difference in the world of food and trade, but instead has stretched it to a transnational scale. French Beans and Food Scares explores the cultural economies of two 'non-traditional' commodity trades between Africa and Europe--one anglophone, the other francophone--in order to show not only why they differ but also how both have felt the fall-out of the wealthy world's food scares. In a voyage that begins in the mid-19th century and ends in the early 21st, passing by way of Paris, London, Burkina Faso and Zambia, French Beans and Food Scares illuminates the daily work of exporters, importers and other invisible intermediaries in the global fresh food economy. These intermediaries' accounts provide a unique perspective on the practical and ethical challenges of globalized food trading in an anxious age. They also show how postcolonial ties shape not only different societies' geographies of food supply, but also their very ideas about what makes food good.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 28.10.2020
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French Beans and Food Scares
33,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

From mad cows to McDonaldization to genetically modified maize, European food scares and controversies at the turn of the millennium provoked anxieties about the perils hidden in an increasingly industrialized, internationalized food supply. These food fears have cast a shadow as long as Africa, where farmers struggle to meet European demand for the certifiably clean green bean. But the trade in fresh foods between Africa and Europe is hardly uniform. Britain and France still do business mostly with their former colonies, in ways that differ as dramatically as their national cuisines. The British buy their 'baby veg' from industrial-scale farms, pre-packaged and pre-trimmed; the French, meanwhile, prefer their green beans naked, and produced by peasants. Managers and technologists coordinate the baby veg trade between Anglophone Africa and Britain, whereas an assortment of commercants and self-styled agro-entrepreneurs run the French bean trade. Globalization, then, has not erased cultural difference in the world of food and trade, but instead has stretched it to a transnational scale. French Beans and Food Scares explores the cultural economies of two 'non-traditional' commodity trades between Africa and Europe--one anglophone, the other francophone--in order to show not only why they differ but also how both have felt the fall-out of the wealthy world's food scares. In a voyage that begins in the mid-19th century and ends in the early 21st, passing by way of Paris, London, Burkina Faso and Zambia, French Beans and Food Scares illuminates the daily work of exporters, importers and other invisible intermediaries in the global fresh food economy. These intermediaries' accounts provide a unique perspective on the practical and ethical challenges of globalized food trading in an anxious age. They also show how postcolonial ties shape not only different societies' geographies of food supply, but also their very ideas about what makes food good.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 28.10.2020
Zum Angebot
French Beans and Food Scares
29,30 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

From mad cows to McDonaldization to genetically modified maize, European food scares and controversies at the turn of the millennium provoked anxieties about the perils hidden in an increasingly industrialized, internationalized food supply. These food fears have cast a shadow as long as Africa, where farmers struggle to meet European demand for the certifiably clean green bean. But the trade in fresh foods between Africa and Europe is hardly uniform. Britain and France still do business mostly with their former colonies, in ways that differ as dramatically as their national cuisines. The British buy their 'baby veg' from industrial-scale farms, pre-packaged and pre-trimmed; the French, meanwhile, prefer their green beans naked, and produced by peasants. Managers and technologists coordinate the baby veg trade between Anglophone Africa and Britain, whereas an assortment of commercants and self-styled agro-entrepreneurs run the French bean trade. Globalization, then, has not erased cultural difference in the world of food and trade, but instead has stretched it to a transnational scale. French Beans and Food Scares explores the cultural economies of two 'non-traditional' commodity trades between Africa and Europe--one anglophone, the other francophone--in order to show not only why they differ but also how both have felt the fall-out of the wealthy world's food scares. In a voyage that begins in the mid-19th century and ends in the early 21st, passing by way of Paris, London, Burkina Faso and Zambia, French Beans and Food Scares illuminates the daily work of exporters, importers and other invisible intermediaries in the global fresh food economy. These intermediaries' accounts provide a unique perspective on the practical and ethical challenges of globalized food trading in an anxious age. They also show how postcolonial ties shape not only different societies' geographies of food supply, but also their very ideas about what makes food good.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 28.10.2020
Zum Angebot
French Beans and Food Scares
29,30 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

From mad cows to McDonaldization to genetically modified maize, European food scares and controversies at the turn of the millennium provoked anxieties about the perils hidden in an increasingly industrialized, internationalized food supply. These food fears have cast a shadow as long as Africa, where farmers struggle to meet European demand for the certifiably clean green bean. But the trade in fresh foods between Africa and Europe is hardly uniform. Britain and France still do business mostly with their former colonies, in ways that differ as dramatically as their national cuisines. The British buy their 'baby veg' from industrial-scale farms, pre-packaged and pre-trimmed; the French, meanwhile, prefer their green beans naked, and produced by peasants. Managers and technologists coordinate the baby veg trade between Anglophone Africa and Britain, whereas an assortment of commercants and self-styled agro-entrepreneurs run the French bean trade. Globalization, then, has not erased cultural difference in the world of food and trade, but instead has stretched it to a transnational scale. French Beans and Food Scares explores the cultural economies of two 'non-traditional' commodity trades between Africa and Europe--one anglophone, the other francophone--in order to show not only why they differ but also how both have felt the fall-out of the wealthy world's food scares. In a voyage that begins in the mid-19th century and ends in the early 21st, passing by way of Paris, London, Burkina Faso and Zambia, French Beans and Food Scares illuminates the daily work of exporters, importers and other invisible intermediaries in the global fresh food economy. These intermediaries' accounts provide a unique perspective on the practical and ethical challenges of globalized food trading in an anxious age. They also show how postcolonial ties shape not only different societies' geographies of food supply, but also their very ideas about what makes food good.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 28.10.2020
Zum Angebot